18 Miles Per Hour

18 MilesPerHour is about riding through the world instead of just passing it by.
NEW BIKE SKILLS: MUSH.
There’s some skills and things I can do on a bike, there’s many I can’t, and few I’m sure, I’ll still have time to learn.
This Summer’s family pilgrimage to Utah brought new downhill skills to the littler cyclists in my family. Bunny hops, drop offs, teeter totters, and simply getting on and off a chair lift on one’s own. For me, I refined a particular technique that is necessary for my family. Namely, dog handling, while guiding and riding with three children and a lovely lady.
We have a dog. There, you can see him up there. It’s the white fluffy thing that looks like Snowy from Tintin. He’s part of the family - apparently.  I have a strained relationship with the dog, but one thing that I can’t fault him for (and believe me, there are many things that I can) it is being protective, territorial and generally a guardian of my children and lovely lady. Which is nice, right? Not when we’re out in the wilderness, in a state park, camping or anywhere where there’s a chance we’ll encounter other people, dogs or creatures.
He needs to be leashed…but we like to ride. So he needs to be on a leash while we ride. No easy task, that.
And we’ve discovered that he prefers to be at the back of the pack, protecting us, I suppose. So it falls to me, with my superior bike and now dog/bike handling skills to bring up the mutt and the rear.
It’s a skill. Occasionally it feels like this, but not often. But we’re practicing, so we can get as good as this.
Oh, his name? Rinky. Rinky-the-dog. Occasionally, Rinky the f*&$#in’ dog’.
Mush.
Rhys

NEW BIKE SKILLS: MUSH.

There’s some skills and things I can do on a bike, there’s many I can’t, and few I’m sure, I’ll still have time to learn.

This Summer’s family pilgrimage to Utah brought new downhill skills to the littler cyclists in my family. Bunny hops, drop offs, teeter totters, and simply getting on and off a chair lift on one’s own. For me, I refined a particular technique that is necessary for my family. Namely, dog handling, while guiding and riding with three children and a lovely lady.

We have a dog. There, you can see him up there. It’s the white fluffy thing that looks like Snowy from Tintin. He’s part of the family - apparently.  I have a strained relationship with the dog, but one thing that I can’t fault him for (and believe me, there are many things that I can) it is being protective, territorial and generally a guardian of my children and lovely lady. Which is nice, right? Not when we’re out in the wilderness, in a state park, camping or anywhere where there’s a chance we’ll encounter other people, dogs or creatures.

He needs to be leashed…but we like to ride. So he needs to be on a leash while we ride. No easy task, that.

And we’ve discovered that he prefers to be at the back of the pack, protecting us, I suppose. So it falls to me, with my superior bike and now dog/bike handling skills to bring up the mutt and the rear.

It’s a skill. Occasionally it feels like this, but not often. But we’re practicing, so we can get as good as this.

Oh, his name? Rinky. Rinky-the-dog. Occasionally, Rinky the f*&$#in’ dog’.

Mush.

Rhys

  1. 18milesperhour posted this