18 Miles Per Hour

18 MilesPerHour is about riding through the world instead of just passing it by.
NEVER PLAY TENNIS DURING WIMBLEDON
I used to be fairly competitive at tennis from youth tournament play through high school. Needless to say I spent a good percentage of my young life down at the local courts (Perris Hill Park in smoggy ol’ San Bernardino, California). There was, however, one time of the year that we would give ourselves a break to recover.
Wimbledon time.
That’s when every well-meaning person with a racquet in their closet would dust off the ol’ Jack Kramer and hit the courts. It was good for the sport but bad for those who didn’t enjoy long wait times and stray balls flying at your tender, no-no special place.
Sure, there were some guys who relished this time as an occasion to alpha-male the new, under-qualified competition. I think we called them d-bags even back then. Which brings us to cycling.
Le Tour brings out the cyclist in a lot of folks. Long-flattened tires get pumped up, helmets get dusted off and they hit the roads, inspired by the musical lilt of Sir Liggett’s voice. And although it’s tempting to avoid the more heavily-trafficked cycling areas, I take a different approach.
I try to use this time to be an ambassador of cycling. Modeling good behavior out there and sharing the joys of cycling.
Okay, all that sounds like I go out proselytizing as if cycling was a religion. I don’t. I just try to be welcoming, not a competitive d-bag. It’s not as if that’s my style anyway, but still.
So now Le Tour is over and, as far as the general public is concerned, the sport is put into deep storage until next year. But for those folks I met out there on the road and trail, I hope the enjoyment lingers and they keep heading out.
I hope I see you on the courts and the roads and the trails.
- Brian

NEVER PLAY TENNIS DURING WIMBLEDON

I used to be fairly competitive at tennis from youth tournament play through high school. Needless to say I spent a good percentage of my young life down at the local courts (Perris Hill Park in smoggy ol’ San Bernardino, California). There was, however, one time of the year that we would give ourselves a break to recover.

Wimbledon time.

That’s when every well-meaning person with a racquet in their closet would dust off the ol’ Jack Kramer and hit the courts. It was good for the sport but bad for those who didn’t enjoy long wait times and stray balls flying at your tender, no-no special place.

Sure, there were some guys who relished this time as an occasion to alpha-male the new, under-qualified competition. I think we called them d-bags even back then. Which brings us to cycling.

Le Tour brings out the cyclist in a lot of folks. Long-flattened tires get pumped up, helmets get dusted off and they hit the roads, inspired by the musical lilt of Sir Liggett’s voice. And although it’s tempting to avoid the more heavily-trafficked cycling areas, I take a different approach.

I try to use this time to be an ambassador of cycling. Modeling good behavior out there and sharing the joys of cycling.

Okay, all that sounds like I go out proselytizing as if cycling was a religion. I don’t. I just try to be welcoming, not a competitive d-bag. It’s not as if that’s my style anyway, but still.

So now Le Tour is over and, as far as the general public is concerned, the sport is put into deep storage until next year. But for those folks I met out there on the road and trail, I hope the enjoyment lingers and they keep heading out.

I hope I see you on the courts and the roads and the trails.

- Brian

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