18 Miles Per Hour

18 MilesPerHour is about riding through the world instead of just passing it by.

BERKELEY BIKES

Spent all last week in Berkeley for work.

Couldn’t take my bike with me.

I was haunted by bikes wherever I went.

Not just actual bicycles – and there were plenty of those – but images of them.

Reminding me.

Taunting me.

- Brian


ALMOST ZERO
I was solo for this morning’s ride.
The numbers?
6:15am start
83 minutes of riding
16.06 miles total
18 beetles I counted on the trail
9,830,420 people living in Los Angeles
0 people I saw. It was delightful. 
No one.
Not a soul.
Almost.
1/4 mile from the end of the ride, there he came. Up the trail. Huffing and puffing. A man, sporting white lycra running tights, shirtless apart from his iPod.
Only in LA.
- Rhys


ALMOST ZERO

I was solo for this morning’s ride.

The numbers?

6:15am start

83 minutes of riding

16.06 miles total

18 beetles I counted on the trail

9,830,420 people living in Los Angeles

0 people I saw. It was delightful. 

No one.

Not a soul.

Almost.

1/4 mile from the end of the ride, there he came. Up the trail. Huffing and puffing. A man, sporting white lycra running tights, shirtless apart from his iPod.

Only in LA.

- Rhys

UNIVERSAL TRUTH OF CYCLING #28: THE HAMMER AND CYCLE.
The Quantity Theory of Cycling or Hammer and Cycle Truth is as follows:
At any point in your cycling career, when you feel the rush of adrenaline, and the surge of strength in your limbs (and even though you claim to not be the competitive type - or even if you do) there is a moment when you drop a gear, stand or just drive a little harder, beginning to nudge forward from your fellow cyclists. You crest that hill just a moment sooner. Or you hammer like buggery as if there’s no tomorrow, and what started as a gentle spin turns into a wolf pack ride.
Here’s where the truth comes in. See, the degree to which you hammer and dish out that pain – the distance you put between you and your current riding partner (formerly referred to as a friend) – will be hammered back to you at some point. That amount, in equal, no more, no less, the exact serving of humble pie, will be dished back to you by someone faster and fitter.
There is a consistent amount of pain, suffering and distance out there on the hills and trails. It circulates between us all, constantly shifting, a form of transaction of effort, time and ego. The theory applies to millimeters as much to miles, but always in equal measures. It’s there. By God, it is there.
So whether you are the hammerer or the cursing hammeree (nail?), remember the Quantity Theory. I find it both a comfort and a warning.
The Quantity Theory of Cycling.
You’ve been warned.
Hammer and Cycle is a Registered ™ of 18milesperhour.com

UNIVERSAL TRUTH OF CYCLING #28: THE HAMMER AND CYCLE.

The Quantity Theory of Cycling or Hammer and Cycle Truth is as follows:

At any point in your cycling career, when you feel the rush of adrenaline, and the surge of strength in your limbs (and even though you claim to not be the competitive type - or even if you do) there is a moment when you drop a gear, stand or just drive a little harder, beginning to nudge forward from your fellow cyclists. You crest that hill just a moment sooner. Or you hammer like buggery as if there’s no tomorrow, and what started as a gentle spin turns into a wolf pack ride.

Here’s where the truth comes in. See, the degree to which you hammer and dish out that pain – the distance you put between you and your current riding partner (formerly referred to as a friend) – will be hammered back to you at some point. That amount, in equal, no more, no less, the exact serving of humble pie, will be dished back to you by someone faster and fitter.

There is a consistent amount of pain, suffering and distance out there on the hills and trails. It circulates between us all, constantly shifting, a form of transaction of effort, time and ego. The theory applies to millimeters as much to miles, but always in equal measures. It’s there. By God, it is there.

So whether you are the hammerer or the cursing hammeree (nail?), remember the Quantity Theory. I find it both a comfort and a warning.

The Quantity Theory of Cycling.

You’ve been warned.

Hammer and Cycle is a Registered ™ of 18milesperhour.com

HAPPY FRIDAY. RIDE YOUR BIKE THIS WEEKEND.
And make sure you’re as suave as Bobby Goulet up there. That girl’s heart doesn’t stand a chance. Homeboy was Lancelot for God’s sake.
In Camelot, not this atrocious, unsafe-at-any-speed Lancelot.
Speaking of Lancelot…behold, the Montgomery Ward Excalibur! 
What about Merlin? They’re undergoing a “brand rebirth.” Sounds like a lot of huffing and puffing, sweating and pain, if you ask me.
Don’t let it be forgot
That once there was a spot
For one brief shining moment that was known
As Camelot.

HAPPY FRIDAY. RIDE YOUR BIKE THIS WEEKEND.

And make sure you’re as suave as Bobby Goulet up there. That girl’s heart doesn’t stand a chance. Homeboy was Lancelot for God’s sake.

In Camelot, not this atrocious, unsafe-at-any-speed Lancelot.

Speaking of Lancelot…behold, the Montgomery Ward Excalibur! 

What about Merlin? They’re undergoing a “brand rebirth.” Sounds like a lot of huffing and puffing, sweating and pain, if you ask me.

Don’t let it be forgot

That once there was a spot

For one brief shining moment that was known

As Camelot.


NANCY NEIMAN: YOUR NORMAL, EVERYDAY, PIONEERING CHAMPION.
Looks like a normal, everyday woman out for a ride, eh? Well, she was a fairly normal person who happened to be the U.S. Girl’s National Cycling Champion in 1953. 
When she won it again in 1954 she pointed out that neither she, nor the other entrants, were girls, and it should be changed to “Women’s.”
They agreed.
This woman then took it again in 1956.
And 1957.
She also scrimped and saved so she could go overseas and race for a spell in 1954. She returned in 1956 and – using a borrowed jersey – was the sole American entrant in the stage race that was the women’s equivalent of Le Tour. She took 14th.
That makes her the first American of either sex to do a stage race in Europe.
Average, everyday woman? Hardly.  
(thanks to Archival Clothing and Flickr contact Paris-Roubaix)

NANCY NEIMAN: YOUR NORMAL, EVERYDAY, PIONEERING CHAMPION.

Looks like a normal, everyday woman out for a ride, eh? Well, she was a fairly normal person who happened to be the U.S. Girl’s National Cycling Champion in 1953. 

When she won it again in 1954 she pointed out that neither she, nor the other entrants, were girls, and it should be changed to “Women’s.”

They agreed.

This woman then took it again in 1956.

And 1957.

She also scrimped and saved so she could go overseas and race for a spell in 1954. She returned in 1956 and – using a borrowed jersey – was the sole American entrant in the stage race that was the women’s equivalent of Le Tour. She took 14th.

That makes her the first American of either sex to do a stage race in Europe.

Average, everyday woman? Hardly.  

(thanks to Archival Clothing and Flickr contact Paris-Roubaix)


THANK YOU.
This Memorial day, as we remember all who sacrificed for us, let us cyclists also remember the 25th Infantry Bicycle Corps at Fort Missoula, Montana back in 1896. Those are the Buffalo Soldiers you see up there, at Yellowstone. This Infantry was established to see if bikes could work for military purposes in mountainous terrain. Seeing as bikes were getting popular and the Europeans had already been using them for both recreation and military use, we decided to give it a look.
General Nelson A. Miles started all this. He’d seen a six-day race in Madison Square Garden and got the bug. He thought that, unlike a horse, a bike didn’t need to be watered, rested and fed (although most of us have babied ours more than any horse). There’s also the stealth qualities of a bike, compared to a snorting, neighing horse – an asset in battle. So the Bike Corps was formed.
Spalding bikes loaned the soldiers some single speed bikes and they set out on their first jaunt – a four-day, 126 mile trip. Each bike plus gear weighed over a hundred pounds. Not bad considering their rations:
 “…1 jar Armour’s extract of beef, 7 cans beans, 2 lbs. salt, 5 lbs. prunes, 6 lbs. sugar, 5 lbs. rice, 2 lbs. baking powder, 1 can condensed milk, 20 lbs. bacon, 3 cans deviled ham, 2 ounces pepper, 2 lbs. coffee, 35 lbs. flour, 3 cans corn, 1 can syrup, 3 lbs. lard.”
The roads were muddy and steep, creek crossings meant tires had to be re-cemented to the wooden rims, but despite this, longer and tougher journeys were planned to test the men’s mettle.  Journeys of 790 miles in 16 days and, the biggie, a 1,900 mile, 34 day journey from Missoula to St. Louis.
In the end, they realized that an Army Bicycle Corps could travel twice as fast as a typical cavalry or infantry and at one-third the cost and effort.
A large part of those tremendous stats and conclusions can be attributed to the spirit and toughness of those Buffalo Soldiers.
Thanks, guys. And thanks to everyone who’s made the ultimate sacrifice.
(Thanks to Tubulocity for the image and info)

THANK YOU.

This Memorial day, as we remember all who sacrificed for us, let us cyclists also remember the 25th Infantry Bicycle Corps at Fort Missoula, Montana back in 1896. Those are the Buffalo Soldiers you see up there, at Yellowstone. This Infantry was established to see if bikes could work for military purposes in mountainous terrain. Seeing as bikes were getting popular and the Europeans had already been using them for both recreation and military use, we decided to give it a look.

General Nelson A. Miles started all this. He’d seen a six-day race in Madison Square Garden and got the bug. He thought that, unlike a horse, a bike didn’t need to be watered, rested and fed (although most of us have babied ours more than any horse). There’s also the stealth qualities of a bike, compared to a snorting, neighing horse – an asset in battle. So the Bike Corps was formed.

Spalding bikes loaned the soldiers some single speed bikes and they set out on their first jaunt – a four-day, 126 mile trip. Each bike plus gear weighed over a hundred pounds. Not bad considering their rations:

“…1 jar Armour’s extract of beef, 7 cans beans, 2 lbs. salt, 5 lbs. prunes, 6 lbs. sugar, 5 lbs. rice, 2 lbs. baking powder, 1 can condensed milk, 20 lbs. bacon, 3 cans deviled ham, 2 ounces pepper, 2 lbs. coffee, 35 lbs. flour, 3 cans corn, 1 can syrup, 3 lbs. lard.”

The roads were muddy and steep, creek crossings meant tires had to be re-cemented to the wooden rims, but despite this, longer and tougher journeys were planned to test the men’s mettle.  Journeys of 790 miles in 16 days and, the biggie, a 1,900 mile, 34 day journey from Missoula to St. Louis.

In the end, they realized that an Army Bicycle Corps could travel twice as fast as a typical cavalry or infantry and at one-third the cost and effort.

A large part of those tremendous stats and conclusions can be attributed to the spirit and toughness of those Buffalo Soldiers.

Thanks, guys. And thanks to everyone who’s made the ultimate sacrifice.

(Thanks to Tubulocity for the image and info)


HAPPY FRIDAY. RIDE YOUR BIKE THIS WEEKEND.
Look at that yo yo, that’s the way you do it.
In 1985 the Dire Straits album ‘Brothers In Arms’ hit #1 in the US and 24 other countries. It went on to sell over 20 million copies worldwide. Which is why Mr. Knopfler up there can afford vintage bikes like that.
Man how times have changed. Our man Lanolin at Ritte Van Vlaanderen made some videos that are better than that “Money For Nothing” video, but he did them in about 30 seconds on the internet.
With the sultans…with the sultans of swing… 
That’s it. Have a great one and ride safely this holiday weekend. 

HAPPY FRIDAY. RIDE YOUR BIKE THIS WEEKEND.

Look at that yo yo, that’s the way you do it.

In 1985 the Dire Straits album ‘Brothers In Arms’ hit #1 in the US and 24 other countries. It went on to sell over 20 million copies worldwide. Which is why Mr. Knopfler up there can afford vintage bikes like that.

Man how times have changed. Our man Lanolin at Ritte Van Vlaanderen made some videos that are better than that “Money For Nothing” video, but he did them in about 30 seconds on the internet.

With the sultans…with the sultans of swing 

That’s it. Have a great one and ride safely this holiday weekend. 

 

PUT…THE GUN…BACK…IN…THE PANNIER…

(disclaimer: Brian and I do not like guns. Got that? Good. That said…)

A few weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to spend a week working at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn. Lots of gems in there that, believe it or not, are pretty relevant to us cyclists. And some that are just thought-provoking.

Then there’s this – a combination of both.

I give you, the J. Stevens Arms and Tool Co. Bicycle Rifle. c1880.

A bicycle rifle?

A bicycle rifle!

This beauty (damn you, J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company for making such a fetish item that it makes me question my dislike of firearms) caught my eye for obvious reasons. My mind began to wander as to the context which brought about a bicycle rifle. If there are any cycling history scholars out there, enlighten us as to the specifics. We’d love to know.

But a layman’s history of American cycling accounts for a phenomenal explosion in the popularity of cycling during the 1800’s, with a heyday in the 1880’s and 1890’s. Bicycles were, for the first time, popular, affordable (although in 1880 it would cost approximately 6 months wages – seems every bike was like a Vanilla then) and brought flexibility for both work and pleasure. Bicycling was so widespread that in 1890 that cyclists formed the League of American Wheelmen who lobbied for better roads, literally paving the road for the automobile.

Add to that the fact that the wild west spirit was still alive and kicking in America. Guns were commonplace. Manufacturers needed a way to compete in an increasingly-crowded marketplace. It’s not hard to imagine some (handlebar mustachioed, top-hatted) young spark in R&D saying “We’ve done guns for horseback riding, why not guns for these new bi-cycle-thingies!”

Hell, I know I’d have proposed it. And Brian would’ve concepted an entire integrated ad campaign for them (ads for newspapers, telegraph, painted barns and town criers) and they would’ve sold by the millions.

But back to the present. We at 18milesperhour do not, in any way, condone cyclists – or anyone, for that matter - carrying guns. Because there are too many occasions when some driver nearly kills you out there on the road and it’s all too easy to imagine reaching back into the saddlebag and swinging this fella around and…

No. Must stop thinking about that.

- Brian Cassidy and the Sundance Rhys.

Bang!

 

BE SURE TO “LIKE” US ON FACEBOOK.
Why? Who the hell knows. There’s really no real major benefit to you.
But that’s Facebook for you.
You will get our posts conveniently added to your news feed.
It’ll make us look good. We’ll be able to tell people “…hey, we have X amount of Facebook followers…” and they’ll be all “wow, cool” and that’s about it.
It’s shallow but, well, there you go.
Anyway, give it a think.
Again, there’s virtually nothing in it for you but, hey, social media.
Thank you.  

BE SURE TO “LIKE” US ON FACEBOOK.

Why? Who the hell knows. There’s really no real major benefit to you.

But that’s Facebook for you.

You will get our posts conveniently added to your news feed.

It’ll make us look good. We’ll be able to tell people “…hey, we have X amount of Facebook followers…” and they’ll be all “wow, cool” and that’s about it.

It’s shallow but, well, there you go.

Anyway, give it a think.

Again, there’s virtually nothing in it for you but, hey, social media.

Thank you.